Evaluating the Dialogic Activities of London Embassies

When one explores the digital diplomacy activities of embassies, he is often surprised by the number of social media accounts embassies now maintain. For instance, embassies in Washington DC are often active on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.  The rationale for operating several accounts lies in the understanding that audiences use different social media platform…

Digital Diplomacy in the Age of Political Extremity

Introduction Over the past year, a growing number of scholars, diplomats and journalists have reflected on the growing importance of algorithms to the conduct of diplomacy. Some MFAs now employ algorithms to analyze online discourse in foreign countries in an attempt to anticipate civil unrest. Likewise, algorithms are used to identify relevant audiences for public…

The 2017 Social Network of Foreign Ministries

Introduction In May of 2014, I published my analysis of the social network of world foreign ministries (MFAs) on twitter. My assumption was that MFAs would actively follow one another online in order to gather relevant information. For instance, by following other ministries an MFA may be able to identify policy changes in certain countries,…

Evaluating Palestine’s Digital Diplomacy Strategy

Note: A version of this post originally appeared on the USC Centre on Public Diplomacy’s Blog From a diplomatic perspective, Palestine represents a puzzling case study. On the one hand, Palestine has been recognized as an independent state by the UN General Assembly. On the other hand, it is not a full member state of…